What’s at Stake

Bristol Bay’s regional economy generates $1.5 billion annually from commercial fishing and supports 14,000 fishing jobs. Credit: Nick Hall
Bristol Bay is one of the most popular outdoor recreation destinations for Alaskans, hosting thousands of hunters, fishers, and adventurers from across the state each year. Credit: Nanci Lyon
Bristol Bay also generates thousands of full and part-time tourism and recreation jobs. Credit: K Raymond

Our Economy is at Stake

Bristol Bay is home to one of the most valuable commercial fisheries in the world, as well as vibrant sport fishing, hunting, tourism, and recreation. The Pebble Mine puts thousands of American jobs at risk and endangers the health of deep-rooted Alaskan industries.

  • $1.5 billion annual commercial fishery
  • $90 million in Alaska state taxes and licensing fees
  • 14,000 fishing jobs
  • 7,000 sport fishing and hunting jobs
  • Thousands of full and part-time tourism and recreation jobs
Fresh salmon prepared for smoking. Credit: K Raymond
Bristol Bay is one of the most prolific King Salmon runs on Earth. Credit: K Raymond
50% of the world’s wild sockeye salmon are harvested from Bristol Bay. Credit: K Raymond

Our Salmon are at Stake

Salmon are the backbone of Bristol Bay and essential for sustaining Alaska’s seafood industry. They also play a central role in the cultural and spiritual identity of the Yup’ik, Dena’ina, and Alutiiq peoples, and are critical to their way of life. The Pebble Mine will produce billions of tons of contaminated waste, which will destroy our salmon habitat and permanently impact the many communities and industries that depend on it.

  • 50% of the world’s wild sockeye salmon harvest
  • Average annual return of 40-60 million wild salmon
  • One of the most prolific king salmon runs on Earth
  • Internationally renowned salmon sportfishing destination
  • Supports the world’s highest concentration of brown bears, which depend on the bay’s abundant salmon runs to survive
  • Home to millions of acres of wetlands, lakes, and streams critical for salmon spawning
Alaskan families depend on the irreplaceable resources of Bristol Bay.
Bristol Bay supports the world’s highest concentration of brown bears, which depend on the bay’s abundant salmon runs to survive.
Bristol Bay is home to 31 federally recognized Alaska Native tribes, all of whom rely on fishing, hunting, and gathering of wild foods for their livelihoods.

Our Way of Life is at Stake

The people of Bristol Bay and Alaska depend on the bay’s irreplaceable resources to support their families. The Pebble Mine threatens the way of life of countless generations of Alaskans, particularly for the Indigenous people who have called the region home for thousands of years and are among the last intact and sustainable salmon-based cultures remaining in the world.

  • Traditional territory of 31 federally recognized Yup’ik, Dena’ina, and Alutiiq tribes, all of whom rely on fishing, hunting, and gathering of wild foods for cultural and physical sustenance
  • Every Bristol Bay community depends on the bay’s resources to continue a cultural legacy of living on the land. Annually, they replace up to $143.1 million in food costs through harvests of wild fish, game, and plants
  • The bay has sustained generations of commercial fishing families for 130 years
  • Alaskans from across the state visit Bristol Bay to hunt, fish, and adventure every year

You can help stop Pebble Mine.